September 26, 2021

EXPO Magazine

Complete News World

The Taliban initially faced protests with repression, with at least three people shot dead; Watch the video

KABUL – At least three people have been killed and 12 wounded in a Taliban attack on Jalalabad residents near the Pakistan border, in protest of the flag hoisting in a major city. Al-Jazeera broadcaster and Reuters reported.

The move comes a day after the Taliban regained power in Afghanistan last Sunday. I promise “sorry” All people associated with the former pro-Western regime and who respected women’s rights accepted very moderate discourses in the search for international recognition.

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According to the Qatar Channel, the black and white Taliban flag, mounted on a roundabout in Pashtunistan Square, was replaced by protesters with Afghanistan’s traditional black, green and red flag. Videos circulating on social networking sites show people dispersing after hearing gunshots. However, when they captured the city from forces of the former pro-Western government, it was unclear whether Taliban militants who had been patrolling the streets since Sunday were firing them.

Other images show dozens of protesters marching in the streets with Afghan flags in their hands, shouting orders and whistling. According to Al-Jazeera, the fifth largest city in Afghanistan had a “very significant area” of population of 356,000.

According to the New York Times, the video was initially shot in the air to disperse the crowd, citing videos aired by local channels. If not successful, the Taliban will shoot the protesters directly. Babrak Amirzada, a reporter for the local news agency, told the Associated Press that he was attacked by Taliban militants while broadcasting the protests.

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Struggles across the country

The shooting, which took place in a square in the Toronto district on the outskirts of Jalalabad, where another Afghan Taliban flag was erected to replace the Taliban flag, was gradually carried out after the group returned to power. Images of hundreds of people occupying the streets of Ghost in southern Afghanistan are also circulating on the Internet.

In addition to the flags, other images also come into view of the fundamentalist group: On Wednesday, a statue of Abdul Ali Mazari, the main leader of the Shia paramilitary group of Hazara ethnic minorities, fought against the Sunni Taliban during civilian protests. The 1990s war destroyed.

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The Taliban captured Kabul unopposed over the weekend as President Ashraf Ghani fled the country after a blitzkrieg that seized most of the provincial capitals in a week. Within hours, they returned to the Presidential Palace, almost 20 years after the October 2001 US invasion, the beginning of the longest war in U.S. history.

Since returning to power, the Taliban have adopted more moderate rhetoric than was in charge of the country between 1996 and 2001: as long as they respect Islamic law it says that women can work and that they must respect men and that they must work. Conversation. This rhetoric is viewed with suspicion by activists and Western nations, but reports of violence could further affect the group’s desired international recognition.

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Al-Hijrat TV, which is affiliated with the Taliban, released pictures of Mullah Abdul Gani Bhardar’s visit to Afghanistan on Tuesday (17). Bharath landed in Kandahar, the second largest city in the country and the spiritual birthplace of the militant group

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Border with Pakistan

For Afghans who want to leave the country, the situation is complicated. Despite President Joe Biden’s promise that the U.S. military will leave Afghanistan on the 31st of this month, the United States has taken control of Kabul airport and air traffic. After seven Afghans were killed on Monday, U.S. military planes shot down and occupied the runway, and the airport resumed operations Tuesday.

However, the priority for removal was to foreigners: without commercial flights, most Afghans leaving the country worked for other countries’ diplomatic or military services.

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Many Afghans are trying to escape from the mainland: Thousands of people have entered Pakistan via the Spin Boltak-Saman border crossing in the southeast of the country. On Monday alone, Pakistani officials told Al-Jazeera that about 20,000 people had crossed the area, more than twice as much as regular traffic. 13,000 of them are from Afghanistan.

According to the Qatar Channel, prisoners released by the Taliban are fleeing to first aid patients. Until Tuesday, all you have to do is show an Afghan identity document or have Afghan refugee status in the Pakistani territory to cross.

On Wednesday, Islamabad announced that it would issue visas to all journalists, diplomats and foreigners coming from Afghanistan when they land on Pakistani soil or stay in their home countries. Iran, for its part, has said it will close its borders with Afghanistan, indicating a “stabilizing” situation in the neighboring country.